Abbotsbury Primary School
Policy to Promote Good Behaviour
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Rationale

The community expects schools to be places where teachers can teach and students can learn in a safe and orderly environment.

Aims
  • To produce a whole school code that arises from class contributions, that is understood and agreed by all (parents, teachers, children, governors, and non teaching staff ).
  • To promote each child’s self esteem, self discipline, sense of individuality and self worth.
  • To create a positive supportive school ethos where courtesy and respect for others is promoted.
  • To involve the whole school community in the development of rules and awareness of what constitutes positive behaviour, both in school and in the wider community.
  • To establish a system of rewards and sanctions to reinforce and uphold the school rules.
  • To foster an open atmosphere where all staff feel able to share behaviour problems openly.
Entitlement

We believe that all children that attend Abbotsbury Primary School are entitled to work and play in an orderly community where boundaries are clearly marked and understood by all.

Responsibilities

The Headteacher, or Deputy in her absence, has overall responsibility for discipline. However, all staff have responsibility for supporting and maintaining the discipline policy and are expected to effect discipline according to the policy.

Review

This policy will be reviewed in two years or according to the schedule in the School Development Plan, sooner if circumstances dictate.

Links with other Policies

This policy should be read in conjunction with the P.S.H.E. policy, S.E.N. policy, Exclusion policy ( Merton Guidelines ), Health and Safety policy, policy for Equal Opportunities, Community Cohesion policy, Anti-bullying policy and Equality Duty.

Strategies for Promoting Good Behaviour Through  Effective Classroom Management  

a)  Careful planning

b)  Good organisation

c)   Use of voice and body language

d)   Teaching positive behaviour

e)   Building positive relationships

f)   Clear expectations

 

a)       Careful Planning
  • Clear lesson objectives that are shared with the children
  • Differentiated activities
  • Pace and timing
  • Subject knowledge
  • Appropriate resources
  • Clear lesson structure
  • Variety of teaching styles
  • Reflective evaluation
  • Assessment that informs future planning
  • Clear instructions
  • Continuity and progression
  • Opportunities for celebrating success

b)      Organisation

  • Of lesson – planning and preparation
  • Of resources
  • Of equipment – access and condition
  • Of children – grouping
  • Of furniture – seating, space, teacher
  • Of time
  • Of classroom routines
  • Of adult support

c)       Teacher’s use of voice and body language

  • Calm, respectful tone and low pitch of voice
  • Speaking quietly
  • Making eye contact
  • Smiling, nodding, positive hand gestures
  • Non-aggressive and non-threatening body posture
  • Respecting personal space
  • Physically getting down to child’s level

d)       Teaching positive behaviour

  • Having high expectations for behaviour
  • Signalling good behaviour by praising and describing it
  • Modelling expected behaviour, by parents and staff
  • Clearly communicating expected behaviour
  • Agreeing behaviour ‘rules’ with the children and reasons for having them
  • Circle time
  • Making opportunities for children to share and collaborate
  • Making opportunities for children to take on responsibilities
  • Reinforcing routines

e)       Building positive relationships (staff-child, staff-parent, child-child) to raise children’s self esteem

  • Showing an interest in the children as individuals
  • Making time to talk to children individually
  • Generous verbal praise – individual, group, class
  • Showing empathy, acknowledging their feelings in different situations
  • Equal treatment –no favouritism
  • Showing a sense of humour and fallibility
  • Creating opportunities for children to express their feelings
  • Modelling calm, respectful, supportive communication
  • Where sensitive issues need to be discussed by parent(s) and staff, ensure this is conducted in an appropriate manner and at an appropriate time and place

f)       Clear expectations 

  • Of work – pace, presentation, quality and outcome
  • Of behaviour – respect, concentration, achievement and responsibility
  • Of rules – agreed and understood by all
  • Of routines – for the individual, group, class, key stage and whole school

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Strategies for Promoting Good Playground Behaviour

a)   Organisation
b)   Use of voice and body language
c)   Teaching positive behaviour
d)   Building positive relationships
e)   Clear expectations
f)
g)
a)      Organisation
  • All staff to be aware of their role and responsibilities
  • Appropriate playground equipment
  • Being aware of all areas of the playground at all times
  • Being aware of the movement of children in and out of the building

b)      Use of voice and body language

  • Calm, respectful tone
  • Making eye contact
  • Smiling, nodding, positive hand gestures
  • Non – aggressive and non – threatening body posture
  • Respecting personal space
  • Physically getting down to a child’s level

c)      Teaching positive behaviour 

  • Having high expectations of behaviour
  • Signalling good behaviour by praising and describing it
  • Modelling expected behaviour
  • Clearly communicating expected behaviour
  • Agreeing behaviour ‘rules’ with the children and the reasons for having them
  • Making opportunities for children to share and collaborate
  • Making opportunities for children to take on responsibilities
  • Reinforcing routines

 d)      Building positive relationships to raise children’s self esteem

  • Showing an interest in children as individuals
  • Making time to talk to children individually
  • Generous verbal praise-individual, group, class
  • Showing empathy, acknowledging their feelings in different situations
  • Equal treatment –no favouritism
  • Showing a sense of humour and fallibility
  • Creating opportunities for children to express their feelings
  • Modelling calm, respectful, supportive communication

e)      Clear expectations 

  • Of behaviour –respect and responsibility
  • Of rules-agreed and understood by all
  • Of routines-for the individual, group, class, key stage and whole school
Rewards   

1. Verbal praise

2. Stickers, stamps, smiley faces, house points

3. Informal contact with home via diary or word of mouth in playground

4. Certificate and presentation in Gold Award assembly

5. Post card / certificate home

 

Strategies to ‘Check’ Unacceptable Behaviour  

  • Praising the desired behaviour of a nearby child/group
  • Prompting/redirecting the child to return to the appropriate behaviour
  • Reminding child of the relevant aim (respect, concentration, achievement, responsibility)
  • Explaining choices available to child and their consequences
  • Diversion, e.g. sending the child on a message

 

Definitions of Unacceptable Behaviour
Whether directed at children or adults; teaching or non-teaching staff

Bullying (see below)

Racism (see below)

Rudeness

Swearing

Disobedience; refusing to co-operate or follow instructions given by an adult

Lying

Fighting or hurting others

Stealing

Misuse of school property or property of other children

Bullying

Bullying may occur in a variety of ways and a variety of situations. Bullying is :   “The systematic isolation of one child, or a group of children in a threatening way over a period of time by an individual or group. Threats may be verbal, physical or through the use of body language.”

Parents often perceive bullying as being the frequent, short lived disputes, that punctuate the school day.   However, care should be taken to establish which category complaints fall into and the appropriate action should follow. It is vital that complaints are known to be dealt with quickly, fairly and effectively. In the latter case the situation is often easily resolved and the appropriate action can be taken – discussion of the problem, negotiation about ways forward, sanctions or referral to another teacher/ Deputy or Head.   In the case of actual recognised bullying, additional strategies may need to be employed for dealing with the bully and for the person being bullied.  

Racism

When a person is treated in a derogatory fashion, either verbally or physically; or made to feel inferior due to the colour of their skin, race, creed or religion. When this happens it needs to be dealt with promptly and efficiently and the Headteacher should be informed.            

Sanctions

When strategies to support or ‘check’ behaviour have been inadequate to deal with an incident then the behaviour will be met by the following consequences.

In order to be effective consequences must be

  • Prompt, so that the sanction is associated with the behaviour
  • Reasonable, so that the child’s self-esteem is not crushed
  • Fair but flexible
  • Clearly understood by all members of the school community
Consequences  

1 . Warnings and expectations made clear

2. Official warning and notification of consequence

3. Move away from situation within class

4. Move out of class / miss all or part of playtime

5. Detention

6. Make informal contact with home

7. Meet with Deputy Headteacher

8. Make formal contact with parent via standard letter, arrange meeting to set targets(Appendices 2 and 3)

9. If no improvement after 2 weeks a meeting will be called with the Headteacher,SENCO (if appropriate), class teacher and someone from home (PSP)

10. Exclusion

Consequences for Unacceptable Behaviour in the Playground

1. Warning and expectations made clear

2. Time out, stand by the wall

3. Pass on to Senior Mid-day Meal Supervisor

4. Reminder and warning

5. Teacher informed and staged response as for general consequence

6. If immediate removal is required then sent to Headteacher

Outside Agencies

These agencies may be contacted at the discretion of the Headteacher, SENCO or Senior Management Team. Behaviour Support Team Educational Psychologist Counselling services e.g. Grove House

Monitoring the Implementation and  Effectiveness of the Policy

Behaviour will be a fixed agenda item at staff meetings. The S.M.T. will regularly review the behaviour in the school.    

The use of Force to Control or Restrain Pupils 

Wherever possible, strategies will be used to avoid the need to restrain a pupil. However, there may be situations where restraint is necessary. This is when the safety of children or adults is put at risk. There are specific guidelines for these situations, which will be followed. See Restraint policy.

Conclusion    

This policy was written in consultation with:   Teaching staff Non-teaching staff Parents Governors   And with reference to Q.C.A’s Supporting School Improvement Government Guidelines for Restraint (Appendix 4)

 

 

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